Missouri Medical
Waste Disposal

We save you Money by owning our own treatment plants, trucks, & employing our own drivers, from cradle-to-grave we own your medical waste!

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Missouri Healthcare Waste Management Services

Missouri medical waste disposal. We save you Money by owning our own treatment plants, trucks, & employing our own drivers, from cradle-to-grave we own your medical waste!

biohazard waste

Medical Waste Disposal

We specialize in the removal of biohazardous waste from your hospital, medical office or private business.

We specialize in the removal of biohazardous waste from your hospital, medical office or private practice.

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compliance training

Compliance Training

Bloodborne Pathogens Training, Exposure Control Plans, Required Training, Supplies and Vaccinations.

Healthcare Waste Management is here to answer all of your questions about the training required by your facility.

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sharps container disposal

Sharps Container Disposal

Healthcare Waste Management is the perfect partner to help with your sharps disposal needs.

No customer is too big or small for us to help with your safe disposal of needles and sharps. Contact Us Today!

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pharmaceutical waste

RCRA & Pharma Waste

Pharmaceutical waste disposal is becoming one of the most important aspects of environmental services.

Healthcare Waste Management can help your facility manage all of your RCRA and pharmaceutical waste. Call Today. 

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document destruction

Document Destruction

To stay within compliance of the increased government regulations, we provide secure paper shredding for your facility or business.

Our drivers come to your location to set you up with secure locking cabinets or large document carts for safe storage until removal.

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biohazard waste

Biohazard Supplies

From Biohazard, Boxes & Bins to our replacement sharps container program. We have everything you will need. 

In an effort to help our customers better utilize their time, we offer direct supplies delivery at the same time as scheduled services.

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Missouri Medical Waste Disposal services. In Missouri HWM services the following cities and the entire state of Missouri for medical waste disposal: St. Louis, Kansas City, Springfield, Columbia, Independence, Lee's Summit, O'Fallon, Joplin, St. Joseph, St. Charles, Jefferson City, St. Peters, Blue Springs, Cape Girardeau, Florissant, Chesterfield, Farmington, Wentzville, Oakville, Wildwood.

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Missouri Infectious waste, treatment

  1. Any infectious waste transferred from the premises of the generator shall be taken to an infectious waste processing facility that holds a valid permit issued by the department, or a hospital.
  2. No infectious waste shall be placed into a solid waste disposal area except as otherwise provided for unless it has been Missouri Medical waste disposaltreated or rendered innocuous by a permitted infectious waste processing facility, or by a hospital. The process includes, autoclaving, incineration, chemical disinfection, or other methods of treatment approved by the department. The department of health and senior services shall promulgate rules covering the handling and treatment of infectious waste by hospitals, and such rules shall be consistent with the rules of the department.
  3. All such wastes, when transported off the premises of the generator shall be packaged and transported as provided by the rules, except that hospitals and small quantity generators as defined by the department may transport infectious waste to a hospital for treatment, an infectious waste processing facility for treatment or to a central collection point using their employees and vehicles as long as they meet all other requirements and the rules and regulations of the state.
  4. The department of health and senior services shall provide for a registration process for all hospitals pursuant to the provisions. The process shall include a completed and signed application on forms provided by the department of health and senior services.  The forms shall contain the following:

(1)  A statement certifying that the applicant understands and will comply with the applicable requirements; and

(2)  Other requirements established by the department of health and senior services.

  1. Registrations shall be renewed annually.
  2. Unless otherwise provided for, any person who treats infectious waste to the specifications of the department of natural resources or the department of health and senior services, and who proposes to dispose of the residue thereof in a sanitary landfill shall properly identify the waste and shall certify to the transporter and the sanitary landfill operator that the waste has been rendered innocuous and may be legally placed in a sanitary landfill pursuant to the provisions of this section. Persons found to be in violation of this subsection shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor.
  3. Facilities permitted to treat infectious waste shall adhere to an operation plan for the handling and treatment of infectious waste approved by the department of natural resources as provided by rule, and hospitals, allowed to treat infectious waste shall adhere to an operation plan for the handling and treatment of infectious waste approved by the department of health and senior services as provided by rule. The plan shall include, but not be limited to, methods of handling and treating the waste, protection of employees and the public and the maximum amount of waste which may be handled per month.  Approval for acceptance of infectious waste may be withdrawn for noncompliance with the operation plan.  No permitted infectious waste treatment facility shall operate unless it has a solid waste technician trained in the handling of infectious waste on site during any treatment process.  Such operator shall meet the requirements established by the department.
  4. Any transporter or generator who delivers infectious waste to an infectious waste processing facility, except small quantity generators and hospitals located in Missouri and defined in section 197.020 , shall pay a fee of two dollars for each ton of infectious waste so delivered. Such fees shall be collected by the infectious waste processing facility accepting the waste and transmitted to the department.  The department shall promptly transmit funds collected under this section to the director of the department of revenue for deposit in the solid waste management fund.  Moneys, upon appropriation, shall be used to help pay for the administrative costs associated with infectious waste management.  Any transporter or generator who transports infectious waste for more than three hundred miles for management in Missouri shall pay, in addition to the charges above, an additional charge equal to ten percent of the gross charge charged by the processing facility for the management of such waste.  Such fees shall be collected by the infectious waste processing facility accepting the waste and transmitted to the department which shall promptly transmit such fees to the department of revenue for deposit in the general revenue fund.

 

  1. Hospitals located in Missouri, may manage infectious waste generated on the premises by autoclaving, incineration, chemical disinfection or other methods of treatment approved by the department of health and senior services. Such hospitals may also treat infectious waste produced by small quantity generators and other hospitals located in Missouri upon the approval of the department of natural resources and the department of health and senior services.  Failure of either department to respond by issuing a certification to accept infectious waste in writing to a hospital which has filed in writing to both departments a notice of intent to treat waste from another hospital within ninety days constitutes approval of the treatment.  All hospitals licensed by the state of Missouri are exempt from all taxes or fees imposed, provided that no more than twenty-five percent, by weight, of the infectious waste managed by such hospitals is produced by other generators which are not owned or operated by the hospital.

 

  1. Persons generating one hundred kilograms or less of infectious waste per month are exempt from the provisions of this section except that the department of health and senior services shall specify by rule, in accordance with section 192.005 , infectious waste that shall be rendered innocuous regardless of quantity. Any person who disposes of waste exempt from the provisions of this act * in a sanitary landfill shall certify to the transporter or the sanitary landfill operator that the waste has been handled in a manner consistent with the law and may be legally placed in a sanitary landfill.  Rules promulgated by the department of natural resources and the department of health and senior services pursuant to this subsection shall be effective no later than July 1, 1989.  Persons found to be in violation of this subsection shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor.

 

  1. A generator of infectious waste who operates single or multiple site research facilities for research and experimental activities defined in the Internal Revenue Code, who generates such waste as a part of research and experimentation activities, and who manages such waste on site, shall not be required to obtain an infectious waste processing facility permit under this section to manage infectious waste. The generator may accept infectious waste from other sites of the parent research company located in Missouri but shall not accept infectious waste from other sources and shall comply with all other requirements and provisions of the rules and regulations promulgated.  The University of Missouri Ellis Fischel Cancer Center and the other facilities of the University of Missouri-Columbia shall be considered a multiple site research facility.
  2. Nothing in this section shall prohibit the transportation of infectious or hazardous waste from the state of Missouri for management in another state.
  3. The department of natural resources shall establish, by rule, inspection fees to be paid to the department by owners or operators of commercial infectious waste incinerators. The fees shall not exceed the costs of the inspections and shall not exceed ten thousand dollars per year for a facility.  Funds derived from these inspection fees shall be used for the purpose of funding the inspection of commercial infectious waste incinerators.
  4. All owners or operators of commercial infectious waste incinerators shall pay the fees, established by the department by rule, for inspections conducted by the department.
  5. There is hereby created the "Infectious Waste Incinerator Inspection Fund". All funds received from infectious waste incinerator inspection fees shall be paid to the director of the department of revenue and deposited in the state treasury to the credit of the infectious waste incinerator inspection fund.  Moneys from such fund shall be used by the department of natural resources for conducting inspections at commercial infectious waste incinerators.
  6. The department shall furnish to the person, firm or corporation operating the commercial infectious waste facility a complete, full and detailed accounting of the cost of the department's inspection of the facility each time the facility is inspected within thirty days after the inspection is commenced. Failure to do so shall require the department to refund the inspection fee.

Missouri Benefits of Using Healthcare Waste Management Services

We are a management company for all of your waste streams including medical, biohazard, sharps and other wastes that is regulated. From pickup to destruction, we are the only company that handles your waste.

    • We own the waste from pickup to destruction, no middleman, means no hidden cost.
    • Our state-of-the-art processing plants ensure the waste is disposed of as quickly and effectively as possible, with minimum impact to the environment.
    • With us it is our drivers, our trucks, our processing plants and our insurance. You can imagine the insurance one must have when they own their own processing plants.

Join Thousands of other practices using Healthcare Waste Management, "The Only Company You Will Ever Need".

Missouri About

Missouri is a state in the Midwestern United States. With over six million residents, it is the 18th-most populous state of the Union. The largest urban areas are St. Louis, Kansas City, Springfield and Columbia; the capital is Jefferson City. The state is the 21st-most extensive in area. Missouri is bordered by eight states (tied for the most with Tennessee): Iowa to the north, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee (via the Mississippi River) to the east, Arkansas to the south and Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska to the west. In the south are the Ozarks, a forested highland, providing timber, minerals and recreation. The Missouri River, after which the state is named, flows through the center of the state into the Mississippi River, which makes up Missouri's eastern border.

Missouri Medical waste disposal
Healthcare Waste Management
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Helpful Missouri Resources

Missouri Department of Natural Resources

https://dnr.mo.gov/
1101 Riverside Drive
Jefferson City, Missouri 65102
(573) 751-3443

Missouri Department of Health

https://health.mo.gov/
912 Wildwood
Jefferson City, Missouri 65102
(573) 751-6400

Missouri Department of Transportation

https://www.modot.org/
105 W. Capitol Avenue
Jefferson City, Missouri 65102
(314) 453-5021

Missouri Information

The state is named for the Missouri River, which was named after the indigenous Missouri Indians, a Siouan-language tribe. It is said that they were called the ouemessourita, meaning "those who have dugout canoes", by the Miami-Illinois language speakers. This appears to be folk etymology—the Illinois spoke an Algonquian language and the closest approximation that can be made in that of their close neighbors, the Ojibwe, is "You Ought to Go Downriver & Visit Those People." This would be an odd occurrence, as the French who first explored and attempted to settle the Mississippi River usually got their translations during that time fairly accurate, often giving things French names that were exact translations of the native tongue(s).

Assuming Missouri were deriving from the Siouan language, it would translate as "It connects to the side of it," in reference to the river itself. This is not entirely likely either, as this would be coming out as "Maya Sunni" (Mah-yah soo-nee) Most likely, though, the name Missouri comes from Chiwere, a Siouan language spoken by people who resided in the modern day states of Wisconsin, Iowa, South Dakota, Missouri & Nebraska.

Missouri Medical Waste FAQ and Related Searches

What is Medical Waste?

Medical waste is a subset of wastes generated at health care facilities, such as hospitals, physicians' offices, dental practices, blood banks, and veterinary hospitals/clinics, as well as medical research facilities and laboratories.

What is Biohazardous Waste?

Biohazardous waste, also called infectious waste or biomedical waste, is any waste containing infectious materials or potentially infectious substances such as blood. Of special concern are sharp wastes such as needles, blades, glass pipettes, and other wastes that can cause injury during handling.

What is Sharps Waste?

Items that can induce subdermal inoculation of infectious agents or that can easily penetrate the skin, puncture waste bags and cardboard boxes, sharps that have been used or are intended to be used in human or animal patient care or in medical, research, or industrial laboratories, including hypodermic needles, syringes, Pasteur pipettes, capillary tubes, broken glass from the laboratory including slides and slide covers, razor blades, and scalpel blades.

How to Handle Sharps Waste?

Sharps require special handling and packaging under both OSHA and DOT. Be sure to refer to your state’s guidelines when identifying what items are classified as sharps. There is confusion that often needleless injection devices, heel lancers and retractable or needles destruction technologies are considered sharps as well.

Treating Infectious Waste

June 25, 2020

Treating Infectious Waste There are specific methods designed to treat infectious waste so that the contents are no longer a threat to people, the community, animals, or the environment. The guidelines set up for each type of infectious waste involve safety protocols for storage types and safe elimination of anything that may be considered to […] Read More

Infectious Waste Disposal

June 25, 2020

Infectious Waste Disposal Infectious waste contains contaminants that can be infectious to humans and each type has specific local, state, and federal guidelines for proper treatment and disposal. The laws that are established on the local level may be in addition to the standard state and federals laws. Guidelines have been established to protect people, […] Read More

Infectious Waste – an overview

June 22, 2020

Infectious Waste – an overview Infectious waste is mostly found in industries that are health-related, however there are a number of other industries that can have infectious waste. Some of these facilities include, but are not limited to tattoo parlors, autopsy locations, funeral homes, experimental and research labs, university cadaver facilities, and veterinarians.  Any location […] Read More

Proper Medical Waste Packaging, Including Sharps

June 18, 2020

Proper Medical Waste Packaging It’s critical to know that beyond federal requirements for medical waste packaging, there may also be local and state laws that are required for compliance. Knowing all guidelines is important for safety as well as to avoid any financial fines. The organization that generates medical waste of all types is responsible […] Read More

Sharps Management Best Practices

June 17, 2020

Sharps Medical Waste Best Practices Sharps are a special category within medical waste classification and are especially hazardous due to the potential risks for injury which can spread infectious diseases. Sharps are any item used in a facility that can penetrate the skin including, but not limited to hypodermic needles, syringes, blades, lancets, auto-injectors, knives, […] Read More

The Journey Medical Waste Takes

June 15, 2020

The Journey Medical Waste Takes Medical waste is defined on many levels and the packaging, care, storage, and disposal is referred to as “cradle-to-grave.” This means that everyone, at every step, is required to comply with state and federal laws for each type of medical waste, and each type has specific guidelines. The facility that […] Read More

A Medical Waste Disposal Company Picks Up My Waste, What Happens Next?

June 11, 2020

What Happens after a Medical Waste Disposal Company Picks Up My Waste? If your organization generates medical waste, you are responsible for ensuring that the medical waste is disposed of in proper and legal methods. Known as “cradle-to-grave,” the accountability doesn’t end when you have a waste management company pick up the waste. This level […] Read More

Medical Waste Disposal Best Practices During COVID-19 Pandemic

June 10, 2020

Medical Waste Disposal Best Practices During COVID-19 Pandemic The COVID-19 pandemic has presented challenges across the board for the protection against transmission and infection of the virus. While healthcare regulations have long been strict, we are finding that the pandemic has thrown the modern world into almost uncharted territory. Some of the best practices that […] Read More

Compliance Training, Anyone Handling Medical Waste Must Take

June 8, 2020

Compliance Training Any individual in an organization that handles or can be exposed to medical waste is required by law to take compliance training courses as well as updates on the training. The priority of these courses cannot be overemphasized as medical waste can potentially cause illnesses or even death if transmitted as well as […] Read More

Medical Waste Disposal and Dangerous Viruses

June 5, 2020

Medical Waste Disposal & Dangerous Viruses Medical waste is created in a variety of organizations, including tattoo parlors, dental practices, veterinary clinics/hospitals, blood banks, pharmacies, health care facilities, autopsy, funeral homes, and medical laboratories and research facilities. This form of medical waste in healthcare can be contaminated by body fluids, blood, and potentially infectious materials. […] Read More

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